Courses

  • Art of the Western World – [ 3 Credit Hours-DSST ]

    This Art Of The Western World course satisfies the requirements for the DSST Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the DSST Exam Fact Sheet as follows:

    • Ancient World-Ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece and Rome
    • Middle Ages-Early Christian, Byzantine & Romanesque, and Gothic
    • Renaissance-15th & 16th Century Italy and Northern Europe
    • Baroque-Italy, France, Spain, Holland and Flanders
    • Rococo and Neoclassicism
    • Romanticism and Realism
    • Impressionism and Post-Impressionism
    • Early Twentieth Century-Emergency of Modernism and Art Between the World Wars
    • Postwar to Postmodern
    • Contemporary

  • English Literature [3 Credit Hours-CLEP ]

    This English Literature course satisfies the requirements for the CLEP Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the CLEP Exam Overview as follows:

    • British Literature
    • Literary Background
    • Identification of Authors
    • Metrical Patterns
    • Literary References
    • Literary Terms

  • Analyzing and Interpreting Literature [6 Credit Hours-CLEP]

    This Analyzing & Interpreting Literature course satisfies the requirements for the CLEP Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the CLEP Exam Overview as follows: Although the official standardized examination does not require familiarity with specific works, it does assume that you have read widely and perceptively in poetry, drama, fiction and nonfiction.

    • Ability to Read Prose, Poetry and Drama with Understanding
    • Ability to Analyze the Elements of Literary Passage and to REspond to Nuances of Meaning, Tone, Imagery and Style
    • Ability to Interpret Metaphors, to Recognize Rhetorical and Stylistic Devices, to Perceive Relationships Between Parts and Wholes, and to Grasp a Speaker's or Author's Attitudes
    • Knowledge of the Means by which Literary Effects are Achieved
    • Familiarity with the Basic Terminology Used to Discuss Literary Texts

  • American Literature [6 Credit Hours-CLEP]

    This American Literature course satisfies the requirements for the CLEP Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the CLEP Exam Fact Sheet as follows:

    • Knowledge of Particular Literary Works—Their Authors, Characters, Plots, Style, Setting, Themes, etc.
    • Ability to Understand and Interpret Short Poems or Excerpts from Long Poems and Prose Works
    • Knowledge of the Historical and Social Settings of Specific Works, Their Relations to Other Literary Works and to Literary Traditions, and the Influences on Their Authors
    • Familiarity with Critical Terms, Verse Forms, and Literary Devices
    For the Following Periods:
    • The Colonial and Early National Period (Beginnings-1830)
    • The Romantic Period (1830-1870)
    • The Period of Realism and Naturalism (1870-1910)
    • The Modernist Period (1910-1945)
    • The Contemporary Period (1945-Present)

  • Western Civilization II: 1648 to the Present [3 Credit Hours-CLEP]

    This Western Civilization II course satisfies the requirements for the CLEP Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the CLEP Exam Overview as follows:

    • Absolutism and Constitutionalism (1648-1715)-The Dutch Republic, The English Revolution, France Under Louis XIV, Formation of Austria and Prussia, The Westernization of Russia
    • Competition for Empire and Economic Expansion-Global Economy of the Eighteenth Century, Europe after Utrecht (1713-1740), Demographic Change in Eighteenth Century
    • The Scientific View of the World-Major Figures of the Scientific Revolution, New Knowledge of Man and Society, Political Theory
    • Period of Enlightenment-Enlightenment Thought, Enlightened Despotism, Partition of Poland
    • Revolution and Napoleonic Europe-The Revolution in France, The Revolution and Europe, The French Empire, Congress of Vienna
    • The Industrial Revolution-Agricultural and Industrial Revolution, Causes of Revolution, Economic and Social Impact on Working and Middle Class, British Reform Movement
    • Political and Cultural Developments (1815-1848)-Conservatism, Liberalism, Nationalism, Socialism, The Revolutions of 1830 and 1848
    • Politics and Diplomacy in the Age of Nationalism (1850-1914)-The Unification of Italy and Germany, Austria-Hungary, Russia, France, Socialism and Labor Unions, European Diplomacy (1871-1900)
    • Economy, Culture and Imperialism (1850-1914)-Demography, World Economy of the Nineteenth Century, Technological Developments, Science, Philosophy and the Arts, Imperialism in Africa and Asia
    • The First World War and the Russian Revolution- The Causes of the First World War, The Economic and Social Impact of the War, The Peace Settlements, The Revolution of 1917 and its Effects
    • Europe Between the Wars-The Great Depression, International Politics (1919-1939), Stalin's Five-Year Plans and Purges, Italy and Germany Between the Wars, Interwar Cultural Developments
    • The Second World War and Contemporary Europe-The Causes and Course of the Second World War, Postwar Europe, Science, Philosophy, the Arts, and Religion, Social and Political Developments

  • Environment and Humanity [3 Credit Hours-DSST]

    This Environment and Humanity course satisfies the requirements for the DSST Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the DSST Exam Fact Sheet as follows:

                • Ecological Concepts-Ecosystems, Roles of Organisms, Biodiversity and Stability, Energy Flow, Trophic Levels, Food Chains and Food Webs, Biogeochemical Cycling, Biomes and Productivity, Population Biology, Evolution, Succession in Freshwater and Terrestrial Communities
                • Habitat Destruction-Human Population Dynamics, Global Climate and Weather, Ozone Layer, Pollution-Physical, Chemical and Biological Aspects, Agricultural, Technological and Industrial Advances, Industrial Development of Emerging Nations, Habitat Destruction, Desertification, Eutrophication
                • Environmental Management and Conservation-Renewable and Nonrenewable Resources, Agricultural Practices, Pesticides and Pest Control, Soil Conservation and Land Use Practices, Air Pollution Control, Water Quality and Supply, Wastewater Treatment, Solid and Hazardous Waste, Recycling and Resource Recovery, Environmental Risk Assessment
                • Social Processes and Environment-Environmental Laws, Policies and Ethics, Planning and Decision Making, International Policy Conflicts and Agreements, Differing Cultural and Societal Values

  • Fundamentals of Counseling [3 Credit Hours-DSST]

    This Fundamentals of Counseling course satisfies the requirements for the DSST Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the DSST Exam Fact Sheet as follows:

    • Historical Development-Historical Events and Significant Influences, Significant People
    • Counselor Roles and Functions-Counseling as a Profession, Role Expectations in Different Counseling Settings, Professional Associations, Group Approaches, Family Counseling, Individual Counseling
    • The Counseling Relationship-The Therapeutic Alliance, Counselor Characteristics and Skills, Ethical and Legal Issues
    • Theoretical Approaches-Psychodynamic, Humanistic and Experiential, Cognitive-Behavioral, Systems, Postmodern Approaches
    • Social and Cultural Foundations-Multicultural Issues (i.e. Religion, Race, Ability, Gender and Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation, Ethnicity, Socioeconomics, Spiritual, Nontraditional Approaches, etc.), Discrimination Issues (i.e. Gender and Gender Identity, Age, Sexual Orientation, Disability, AIDS, Managed Care, etc.), Societal Concerns (i.e. Substance Abuse, Physical and Sexual Abuse, Stress, Violence)
    • Career Development-Theories, Decision Making Modules, Career Information Resources
    • Human Growth and Development- Child Development, Adolescent Development, Adulthood
    • Assessment and Appraisal Techniques-Testing and Measurement, Models of Assessment, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-V)

  • Money and Banking – Upper Level Course [3 Credit Hours-DSST]

    This Money and Banking course satisfies the requirements for the DSST Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the DSST Exam Fact Sheet as follows:

    • The Role and Kinds of Money-Alternative Definitions of Money, Money and Other Assets
    • Commercial Banks and Other Financial Intermediaries-Regulation of the Banking Industry, Structure of the Banking Industry, Operation and Management of Financial Markets and Intermediaries, Deposit Insurance
    • Money and Macroeconomic Activity-Basic Classical and Keynesian Economics, Monetarism and Rational Expectations, Money and Inflation
    • Central Banking and the Federal Reserve System-Historical and Philosophical Framework, Structure and Organization, Current Monetary Management
    • Monetary Policy in the United States-Policy Effectiveness, Conducting Monetary Policy, Interest Rates and the Impact on Money Supply, Monetary vs. Fiscal Policy, The Financial Crisis of 2008/2009
    • The International Monetary System-International Banking, International Monetary Institutions and Debt Crisis, International Payments and Exchange Rates, Monetary Policy in Conjunction with Exchange Rate

  • Financial Accounting [3 Credit Hours-CLEP]

    This Financial Accounting course satisfies the requirements for the CLEP Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the CLEP Exam Overview as follows:

    • General Topics-Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), Rules of Double-Entry Accounting/Transaction Analysis/Accounting Equation, The Accounting Cycle, Business Ethics, Purpose of, Presentation of, and Relationships Between Financial Statements, Forms of Business
    • The Income Statement-Presentation Format Issues, Recognition of Revenue and Expenses, Cost of Goods Sold, Irregular Items (i.e. Discontinued Operations, Extraordinary Items, etc.), Profitability Analysis
    • The Balance Sheet- Cash and Internal Controls, Valuation of Accounts and Notes Receivable (Including Bad Debts), Valuation of Inventories, Acquisition and Disposal of Long-Term Assets, Depreciation/Amortization/Depletion, Intangible Assets (i.e. Patents, Goodwill, etc.), Accounts and Notes Payable, Long-Term Liabilities (i.e. Bonds Payable), Owner's Equity, Preferred and Common Stock, Retained Earnings, Liquidity, Solvency, and Activity Analysis
    • Statement of Cash Flows-Indirect Method, Cash Flow Analysis, Operating, Financing and Investing Activities
    • Miscellaneous-Investments, Contingent Liabilities

  • Social Sciences and History [6 Credit Hours-CLEP]

    This Social Sciences and History course satisfies the requirements for the CLEP Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the CLEP Exam Overview as follows:

    • History-Understanding of Time and Place Specific Human Experiences Including Political, Diplomatic, Social, Economic, Intellectual and Cultural, United States History, Western Civilization, World History
    • Economics-Economic Measurements, International Trade, Major Theorists and Schools, Monetary and Fiscal Policy, Product Markets, Resource Markets, Scarcity, Choice and Cost
    • Geography-Key Geographical Skills, Cultural Geography, Physical Geography, Population, Regional Geography, Rural and Urban Land Use, Spatial Interaction
    • Government/Political Science-Comparative Politics, International Relations, Methods, United States Civil Rights and Liberties, United States Constitution and Interpretation, United States Institutions, United States Parties, Interest Groups and Media, United States Voting and Political Behavior