Category Social Science

  • Abnormal Psychology [3 Credit Hours-ECE]

    This Abnormal Psychology course satisfies the requirements for the ECE Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the ECE Exam Detail as follows:

    • Introduction and Basic Issues
    • Disorders
    • Treatment, Prevention and Legal Issues

  • Introductory Sociology [3 Credit Hours-CLEP]

    This Introductory Sociology course satisfies the requirements for the CLEP Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the CLEP Exam Overview as follows:

    • Institutions- Economic, Educational, Family, Medical, Political and Religious
    • Social Patterns- Community, Demography, Human Ecology, Rural/Urban Patterns
    • Social Processes- Collective Behavior and Social Movements, Culture, Deviance and Social Control, Groups and Organizations, Social Change, Social Interaction, Socialization
    • Social Stratification (Process and Structure)- Aging, Power and Social Inequality, Professions and Occupations, Race and Ethnic Relations, Sex and Gender Roles, Social Class, Social Mobility
    • The Sociological Perspective- History of Sociology, Methods, Sociological Theory

  • Introductory Psychology [3 Credit Hours-CLEP]

    This Introductory Psychology course satisfies the requirements for the CLEP Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the CLEP Exam Overview as follows:

    • History, Approaches, Methods-History of Psychology, Approaches: Biological, Behavioral, Cognitive, Humanistic, Psychodynamic, Research Methods: Experimental, Clinical, Correlational, Ethics in Research
    • Biological Bases of Behavior-Endocrine System, Etiology, Functional Organization of the Nervous System, Genetics, Neuroanatomy, Physiological Techniques
    • Sensation and Perception-Attention, Other Senses: Somesthesis, Olfaction, Gustation, Vestibular System, Perceptual Development, Perceptual Processes, Receptor Processes: Vision, Audition, Sensory Mechanisms: Thresholds, Adaptation
    • States of Consciousness-Hypnosis and Meditation, Psychoactive Drug Effects, Sleep and Dreaming
    • Learning-Biological Bases, Classical Conditioning, Cognitive Process in Learning, Observational Learning, Operant Conditioning
    • Cognition-Intelligence and Creativity, Language, Memor, Thinking and Problem Solving
    • Motivation and Emotion-Biological Bases, Hunger, Thurst, Sex, Pain, Social Motivation, Theories of Emotion, Theories of Motivation
    • Developmental Psychology-Dimensions of Development: Physical, Cognitive, Social, Moral, Gender Identity and Sex Roles, Heredity-Environment Issues, Research Methods: Longitudinal, Cross-Sectional, Theories of Development
    • Personality-Assessment Techniques, Growth and Adjustment, Personality Theories and Approaches, Research Methods: Idiographic, nomothetic, Self-Concept and Self-Esteem
    • Psychological Disorders and Health-Affective Disorders, Anxiety Disorders, Dissociative Disorders, Health, Stress and Coping, Personality Disorders, Psychoses, Somatoform Disorders, Theories of Psychopathology
    • Treatment of Psychological Disorders-Behavioral Therapies, Biological and Drug Therapies, Community and Preventative Approaches, Insight Therapies: Psychodynamic and Humanistic Approaches
    • Social Psychology-Aggression/Antisocial Behavior, Attitudes and Attitude Change, Attribution Processes, Conformity, Compliance and Obedience, Group Dynamics, Interpersonal Perception
    • Statistics, Tests and Measurements-Descriptive Statistics, Inferential Statistics, Measurement of Intelligence, Reliability and Validity, Samples, Populations, Norms, Types of Tests

  • Life Span Developmental Psychology [3 Credit Hours-DSST]

    This Lifespan Developmental Psychology course satisfies the requirements for the DSST Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the DSST Exam Fact Sheet as follows:

    • The Study of Lifespan Development-Models and Theories, Research Methods, Ethical Issues
    • Biological Development-Genetic Factors (Including Counseling), Prenatal Development and Birth, Physical Development (Nutrition, Health), Motor Development, Sexual Development, Neurological Development, Sensory Development, Aging Process, Dying and Death
    • Perception, Learning and Memory-Perceptual Development, Learning, Conditioning and Modeling, Memory (Over the Entire Life Span), Executive Functioning, Attention and Information Processing
    • Cognition and Language-Cognitive-Development Theory, Problem Solving, Intelligence and Intelligence Testing, Including Criticism, Language Development and Theories, Social Cognition
    • Social, Emotional, and Personality Development-Personality and Emotional Development, Social Behaviors and Development, Singlehood, Cohabitation, Marriage and Family, Extra Familial Settings (i.e. Day-Care, School, Nursing Home, Hospice, College), Occupational Development and Retirement, Adjustment to Life Changes and Stresses, Bereavement and Loss

  • Criminal Justice [3 Credit Hours-DSST]

    This Criminal Justice course satisfies the requirements for the DSST Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the DSST Exam Fact Sheet as follows:

    • Criminal Behavior- Defining Crime (i.e. What is Crime, Accepted Definitions of Crime), Types of Crime, Juvenile Delinquency (i.e. Emergence, Trends, Causation), Measurement of Crime and Delinquency (i.e. UCR, NVCS, Evaluation, Survey Data, Research Data, Methods of Data Collection), Crime in the United States (i.e. Rate, Trends), Theories of Crime
    • Criminal Justice System- Historical Origins and Legal Foundations (i.e. Statutory, Common Law, Case Law, Procedural and Substantive Law, etc.), Crime Control Model vs. Due Process Model, Criminal Justice Agencies (i.e. Law Enforcement, Courts and Corrections)
    • Law Enforcement- History of Policing, Types of Law Enforcement Agencies, Law Enforcement Roles and Responsibilities, Issues and Trends in Policing, The Nature of Law Enforcement (i.e. PTSD, Use of Discretion, Subculture and Demographics (i.e. Race, Gender, Age, etc.)
    • Court System- History of the Court System, Organization, Structure and Levels of the Court System, Adult and Juvenile Court Systems, Pretrial, Trial and Post-Trial Processes (i.e. Bail, Plea Bargaining, Prosecutorial Discretion, Judicial Discretion, Diversion, Waiver, Jury and Verdict), Sentencing Options and Trends
    • Corrections- History of Corrections, Philosophies of Punishment (i.e. Rehabilitation, Restoration, Deterrence, Incapacitation, Retribution), Intermediate Sanctions (i.e. Probation, Parole), Adult Prison Facilities (i.e. Administration and Overcrowding), Juvenile Correctional Facilities (i.e. Types, Functions and Controversies), Capital Punishment (i.e. Controversies), Inmate Characteristics (i.e. Subculture, Gangs and Demographics), Issues and Trends (i.e. Inmate Rights, Security, Healthcare, Privatization and Wrongful Conviction)

  • Foundations of Gerontology [3 Credit Hours-ECE]

    This Foundations of Gerontology course satisfies the requirements for the ECE Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the ECE Exam Detail as follows:

    • Important Concepts of Gerontology
    • Demography of Aging: Trends and Projections
    • Biology and Physical Health
    • Psychology and Mental Health
    • Sociology
    • Economics, Work and Retirement
    • Political Behavior and Public Policy
    • Death and Dying

  • Fundamentals of Counseling [3 Credit Hours-DSST]

    This Fundamentals of Counseling course satisfies the requirements for the DSST Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the DSST Exam Fact Sheet as follows:

    • Historical Development-Historical Events and Significant Influences, Significant People
    • Counselor Roles and Functions-Counseling as a Profession, Role Expectations in Different Counseling Settings, Professional Associations, Group Approaches, Family Counseling, Individual Counseling
    • The Counseling Relationship-The Therapeutic Alliance, Counselor Characteristics and Skills, Ethical and Legal Issues
    • Theoretical Approaches-Psychodynamic, Humanistic and Experiential, Cognitive-Behavioral, Systems, Postmodern Approaches
    • Social and Cultural Foundations-Multicultural Issues (i.e. Religion, Race, Ability, Gender and Gender Identity, Sexual Orientation, Ethnicity, Socioeconomics, Spiritual, Nontraditional Approaches, etc.), Discrimination Issues (i.e. Gender and Gender Identity, Age, Sexual Orientation, Disability, AIDS, Managed Care, etc.), Societal Concerns (i.e. Substance Abuse, Physical and Sexual Abuse, Stress, Violence)
    • Career Development-Theories, Decision Making Modules, Career Information Resources
    • Human Growth and Development- Child Development, Adolescent Development, Adulthood
    • Assessment and Appraisal Techniques-Testing and Measurement, Models of Assessment, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-V)

  • History of the United States I: Early Colonization to 1877 [3 Credit Hours-CLEP]

    This History of the United States I: Early Colonization to 1877 course satisfies the requirements for the CLEP Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the CLEP Exam Overview as follows:

    • Topical Specifications-Political Institutions, Political Developments, and Public Policy, Social Developments, Economic Developments, Cultural and Intellectual Developments, Diplomacy and International Relations
    • Chronological Specifications (1500-1877)-The Nature of Indigenous Societies in North America (The Theme Includes a Small Number of Questions on the Americas Before 1500), The Impact of European Discovery and Colonization Upon Indigenous Societies (Focus on the British Colonies and Also Includes a Small Number of Questions on Spanish, French and Dutch Colonization and the Columbian Exchange), The Origins and Nature of Slavery and Resistance to it, Immigration and the History of Ethnic Minorities, The History of Women, Changing Gender Roles, and Family Structures, The Development and Character of Colonial Societies, British Relations with the Atlantic Colonies of North America, The Changing Role of Religion in American Society, The Causes, Events, and Consequences of the American Revolution, The Content of the Constitution and its Amendments, and Their Interpretation by the United State Supreme Court, The Development and Expansion of Participatory Democracy, The Growth of and Changes in Political Parties, The Changing Role of Government in American Life, The Intellectual and Political Expressions of Nationalism, Major Movements and Individual Figures in the History of American Literature, Art, and Popular Culture, Abolitionism and Reform Movements, Long-Term Democratic Trends (Immigration and Internal Migration), The Motivations for and Character of American Expansionism, The Process of Economic Growth and Development, The Causes and Consequences of Conflicts with Native Americans, The War of 1812, The Mexican-American Ware and the Civil War and Reconstruction

  • History of the United States II: 1865 to the Present [3 Credit Hours-CLEP]

    This History of the United States II: 1865 to Present course satisfies the requirements for the CLEP Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the CLEP Exam Overview as follows:

    • Topical Specifications-Political Institutions and Public Policy, Social Developments, Economic Developments, Cultural and Intellectual Developments, Diplomacy and International Relations
    • Chronological Specifications-The Impact of the Civil War and Reconstruction Upon the South, The Motivations and Character of American Expansionism, The Content of Constitutional Amendments and Their Interpretations by the Supreme Court, The Changing Nature of Agricultural Life, The Development of American Political Parties, The emergence of Regulatory and Welfare State Legislation, The Intellectual and Political Expressions of Liberalism, Conservatism, and Other Such Movements, Long-Term Demographic Trends, The Process of Economic Growth and Development, The Changing Occupational Structure, Nature of Work and Labor Organization, Immigration and the History of Racial and Ethnic Minorities, Urbanization and Industrialization, The Causes of Impacts of Major Wars in American History, Major Movements and Individual Figures in the History of American Arts and Letters, Trends in the History of Women and the Family

  • Introduction to Educational Psychology [3 Credit Hours-CLEP]

    This Introduction to Educational Psychology course satisfies the requirements for the CLEP Standardized Exam. When completed, this course allows the user to measure knowledge, comprehension, application, and analysis of material contained in this course per the CLEP Exam Overview as follows:

    • Educational Aims and Philosophies- Lifelong Learning, Moral/Character Development, Preparation for Careers, Preparation for Responsible Citizenship, Socialization
    • Cognitive Perspective- Attention and Perception, Memory, Complex Cognitive Processes (i.e. Problem Solving, Transfer, Conceptual Change), Applications of Cognitive Theory
    • Behavioral Perspective- Classical Conditioning, Operant Conditioning, Schedules of Reinforcement, Applications of Behavioral Perspectives
    • Development- Cognitive, Social, Moral, Gender Identity/Sex Roles
    • Motivation-Social- Cognitive Theories of Motivation (i.e. Attribution Theory, Expectancy-Value Theory, Goal Orientation Theory, Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation, Self-Efficacy, Self-Determination Theory), Learned Helplessness, Teacher Expectations/Pygmalion Effect, Anxiety/Stress, Applications of Motivational Theories
    • Individual Differences- Intelligence, Genetic and Environmental Influences, Exceptionalities in Learning (i.e. Giftedness, Learning Disabilities, Behavior Disorders), Ability Grouping and Tracking
    • Testing- Classroom Assessment (i.e. Formative and Summative Evaluation, Grading Procedures), Norm- and Criterion-Referenced Tests, Test Reliability and Validity, Bias in Testing, High-Stakes Assessment, Interpretation of Test Results (i.e. Descriptive Statistics, Scaled Scores), Use and Misuse of Tests
    • Pedagogy- Planning Instruction for Effective Learning, Social Constructivist Pedagogy (i.e. Scaffolding), Cooperative/Collaborative Learning, Classroom Management
    • Research Design and Analysis- Research Design (i.e. Longitudinal, Experimental, Case Study, Quasi-Experimental), Research Methods (i.e. Survey, Observation, Interview)
    • Interpretation of Research (i.e. Correlation vs. Causation, Descriptive Statistics)